What Is Medicare Hospice?

Does Medicare Pay For Hospice?
Does Medicare Pay For Hospice Care?

Medicare pays for hospice, but what is hospice exactly?

Medicare defines hospice as a program of care and support for people who are terminally ill.  Terminal illness, as Medicare definites it, is a life expectancy of six months or less.  The primary goal of hospice in Medicare is to help terminally ill people live a comfortable life and manage their pain and discomfort.  Hospice care is palliative care versus skilled nursing and home health care.  Hospice does not cure the patient but rather aids the person in the dying process.

Death & dying is an area most people do not wish to ponder, so there are many misconceptions about Medicare-covered hospice care.

What Medicare Hospice Is Not?

Hospice is not a place.  When my mother was terminally ill with ovarian cancer, I was thinking of taking her to a place.

what does medicare pay for hospice care

When I was in college in the 80s, I had volunteered in a hospice facility run by the Hawthorne Dominican sisters.  The hospice facility was an actual place people went to die.  The nuns took care of everything: medical, personal care, food & lodging; and patients stayed there until the end.

That is what I had in mind when the doctors spoke to my family about hospice for our mother.  That is not, however, how Medicare thinks of hospice. 

Medicare does not pay for a hospice facility that provides room & board unless the care is tied to something like a skilled nursing facility.  Medicare does, however, pay for hospice personnel and the medications they administer during hospice.

Where Do You Go For Hospice?

Hospice can be given virtually anywhere.  A Medicare beneficiary can receive hospice at a hospital, hospice in a skilled nursing facility, hospice in an assisted living residence, and hospice at home.  Medicare will pay for hospice care in assisted living, nursing homes, and other facilities if it is a Medicare-approved facility.

The end of life movement that started in the ’70s sees passing at home as the ideal.  Most Medicare patients, when surveyed, prefer hospice in the home.  That is where people feel most comfortable, but because of the level of care required, hospice care may have to move to a hospital in the last few days or another location.

Hospice can be given virtually anywhere. 

Medicare.gov

What Kind of Illness Makes You Hospice Eligible?

When we think of hospice, we usually think of cancer, but there are other illnesses that result in hospice.

Grandpa Joe was 98.  Grandpa had beaten cancer 4 times, lockjaw, and the Second World War.  Dying didn’t seem possible. He had always been there, and we grandkids assumed he would always be there. Terminal illness and Grandpa Joe didn’t fit. 

When Grandma Hilda announced to the family, Grandpa had congestive heart failure and was going into hospice, it didn’t quite register with us grandkids. 

Grandpa Joe seemed the same old Grandpa Joe. When I was home from college, we chatted about the Cornhuskers, baseball, and politics.  Nothing seemed to have changed, but there was a procession of nurses and therapists who came in and out of their home.

When Grandma Hilda finally called to tell us Grandpa had passed in his sleep, his death hit me like a sledgehammer.

Grandpa’s passing was hard on everyone, but Medicare providing and paying for hospice lightened the burden, especially for my parents and grandparents.

Does Medicare Pay For Hospice

Who Can Go Into Hospice?

Hospice is also not exclusively for the old.  I have a number of clients who are in their twenties and thirties.  Not everyone on Medicare is sixty-five and older, though the majority are. 

Accidents or illnesses permanently disabled some, and some are terminal.  Hospice is for them too.

How Much Is Hospice?

Hospice care is not expensive for those on Medicare.  Medicare pays for the vast majority of the hospice costs under Medicare Part A with very little out-of-pocket costs.  Medications, some equipment, and nurses are covered. 

Like I said earlier, hospice does not usually include custodial care or housekeeping.  That can be very costly if the family cannot provide that type of care themselves.

How Do You Get Medicare To Pay For Hospice?

A Medicare beneficiary is eligible for Medicare’s hospice care benefit if she is entitled to Medicare Part A and meets the following conditions.

  1. The hospice doctor and the person’s regular physician certify that the person is terminally ill with a life expectancy of six months or less if the illness runs its Does Medicare Cover Hospice?expected course.
  2. The person accepts palliative care for comfort instead of care to cure her illness.
  3. The person must sign a statement choosing hospice care instead of other Medicare-covered treatments for her terminal illness and related conditions.
  4. The care is provided by a Medicare-certified hospice agency.

When these 4 critical are met, Medicare pays for hospice. At any time, a person may choose to exit hospice.

Is Hospice Euthanasia?

Hospice does not accelerate the dying process. 

I have had people describe hospice to me as akin to euthanasia where someone actively terminates a life.  Hospice is not euthanasia or assisted suicide.  You do not intentionally cut short a person’s life.  Hospice is about allowing the dying process to take its natural and inevitable course without assistance.  Hospice care is about alleviating the suffering and providing comfort while the person dies.

Does Medicare Cover Hospice?

An uncle of mine was a retired Omaha police captain. Uncle Bill had a severe stroke with many complications.  He was put on a ventilator. 

Uncle Bill was a strong and courageous individual.  A vegetative existence was not for him not to mention impoverishing his wife with medical bills.  He ordered the ventilator turned off.

Without the ventilator, he would quickly stop breathing.  He knew it.  The doctors made him as comfortable as possible with heavy sedation.  His body fought hard against the loss of breath.

We gathered around his hospital bed.  Over the course of a day, he passed peacefully from this life to next surrounded by his loving wife and children.

Hospice Is Up To You

I’ve known many individuals over the years who have gone on hospice for a time.  Instead of dying, their health improved, or they resumed a normal life and quit hospice because the decline stopped.  You are free to remove yourself from hospice at any time.

Hospice Is Also For The Living

Hospice is the option when all other alternatives have been exhausted.  It is the option to bring the highest possible quality of life to a person’s remaining time.  The hope is family members will look back on their time and know that everything was done to preserve, prolong, and then peacefully say goodbye.

does medicare pay for hospice at home

While you may struggle with the challenge of terminal illness, the end of your life and hospice is as much about your loved ones as it is about you.  Watching you suffer and your family’s grief afterward will be their burden.  Dying is equally about them.  Understanding that there is something for them as well as you in a scary time can give you all hope that the last great challenge in life will be a little less daunting.

While hospice ends with a patient’s death, family grief counseling can continue for up to a year.  Medicare pays for that hospice care too.

One’s mortality is difficult to face, but the chance you will go on Medicare hospice at the end of your life is more than 50%.  That is an extraordinary number, so having confidence Medicare will pay for hospice is critical.

Jimmo vs. Sebelius On Skilled Nursing

Skilled Nursing Care is amazingly complex. Because the Medicare coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility stays is so confusing, patients sued.  The case went all the way to the Federal Courts. Jimmo vs. Sebelius, a class-action lawsuit, challenged the Center For Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) interpretation of the “improvement stand” that many used to interpret Medicare coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility booklet.

Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility Stays: Improvement Standard

Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facilities This one hit home for me because of how it affected my mother and our family. My mother was in the last stages of ovarian cancer. It became clear that no treatment was going to work. She was on palliative care. During one of her episodes, she was in extreme pain. The hospital admitted my mother because intravenously administered pain killers were the only way to get her pain under control. After that, she was supposed to come home. But her condition was such that we were not going to be able to care for her adequately. We talked about a nursing home—skilled nursing—but one of the criteria at the time was the patient must be able to improve. Because she was terminal, improvement was definitely not in the cards. We were initially told that Medicare would not pay for her stay in a skilled nursing facility. However, that was not accurate. The people we were talking with were operating off old, outdated information.

Slow Deterioration of a Condition

On January 24, 2013, the class action lawsuit Jimmo vs Sebelius settled in favor of the patient, and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) clarified its policy.  Medicare coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility stays no longer required “improvement.”  Instead, care could be prescribed to maintain the status of an individual’s condition, or slow the deterioration of a condition, as well as to improve the person’s condition.

Jimmo Website Explains New Medicare Coverage

As ordered by the federal judge in Jimmo v. Sebelius, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a new webpage containing important Jimmo vs. Sebelius information about the Jimmo Settlement on its CMS.gov website. The Jimmo webpage is the final step in a court-ordered Corrective Action Plan.  The action reinforces the fact that Medicare does cover skilled nursing and skilled therapy services needed to maintain a patient’s function or to prevent or slow decline. Improvement or progress is not necessary as long as skilled care is required. The Jimmo standards apply to home health care, nursing home care, outpatient therapies, and, to a certain extent, for care in Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities.

In my mother’s case, the skilled nursing facility admitted my mother, even though she was terminal, to help slow the deterioration of her health. As it turned out, she passed away within two weeks of her admittance, and the personnel at her skilled nursing facility were outstanding! They made her last days as bearable as the situation would allow.

Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facilities Changed

Skilled Nursing CareMedicare coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility stays practices have changed.  Researchers assessed the impact of the Jimmo settlement by looking at changes to the number of physical therapy and/or occupational therapy visits per year, per patient, focusing specifically on the number of individuals who had 12 or more therapy visits during a 12-month timespan.

Healthcare is very expensive. There are many conflicting groups and interests. The rules, policies, and mechanisms are complex. Some of the people you deal with can be frustrating. The complexity of the system is driven home to me daily as I talk with clients and deal with issues that arise. You need to be aware of the rules and regulations around Medicare coverage and nursing home care. Or have someone who knows them and can help.

10050MPeople constantly ask me, ‘What should I do about Medicare?’  They are overwhelmed with all the brochures from insurance companies.  They look through the 162 pages of the Official Medicare Handbook and are further confused.  Some go to the Medicare.gov website, and are confounded in attempts to navigate through the endless ocean of information.  They simply ask in bewilderment, “What does everyone else do?’  A huge number of people choose a Medicare supplement, or Medigap plan, as the solution, but more of an answer is needed than just ‘everyone is doing it.’  Some thoughtful consideration is required.

Part A Deductible

Medicare is a generous health plan.  It covers a majority of the hospital and doctor costs, but there is some important exposure to be aware of.  Medicare Part A covers the hospital, but only after you pay the deductible of $1,288.  That deductible is not an annual deductible.  It is per event within a 60 day period.  While you would have to be very unlucky, very sick, or both, you could pay that deductible an endless number of times.  That is your exposure.

Part B Co-Insurance

Medicare Part B covers 80% of the doctor and outpatient procedures.  While that is quite generous, 20% of a big number is still a big number.  Heart attacks, strokes, cancer treatment can run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Twenty percent of a $200,000 bill is $40,000.  Most people would find that beyond the family budget.

MOOP

And with Part A & B, there is NO maximum-out-of-pocket (MOOP).  In other words, you continue to pay as the bills roll in.  You do not stop paying on deductibles and co-insurance if all you have is Original Medicare without anything else.

So comes the questions from clients: ‘What should I do about Medicare?’  Medicare supplements or Medigap plans fill in those gaps in Medicare.  They cover the hospital deductibles and 20% co-insurance for doctor and outpatient use.  Depending on how much you wish to cover, the Medigap plan can cover everything 100%, most of everything, or a potion.  You choose.  There are ten plans available.

12,200,000 Satisfied Medigap Clients

The fact that 22% of people on Medicare choose a supplement and stay on a supplement for 20-30 years tells you the level of satisfaction.  There are currently 55,200,000 Medicare beneficiaries.  Of that number 12,200,000 chose a supplement.  That number grows each year: 9.7 million in 2010 to 12.2 million in 2015.  The key number is that 9 out of 10 Medigap beneficiaries say that they are satisfied with their coverage and keep their coverage.  Med Sup Conference Stats

While Medicare is a wonderful health insurance program for seniors, it doesn’t cover everything.  You still have exposure to significant financial loss if you only have Medicare alone.

innerOne of the things that holds people back from purchasing a Medicare supplement is that they don’t know.  That is, they don’t investigate what Medigap plans are, what the costs are, how much or little they cover.  It is simple as making a phone call 402-614-3389.  A quote will not cost you anything, but you will have some real, solid information for your decision making process.  Take a couple minutes, answer a few questions, and you will be surprised how easily you can find out what you should do about your Medicare @ OmahaInsuranceSolutions.com.

What Our Clients Are Saying About Omaha Insurance Solutions

Tom V.

I was very impressed with the knowledge Chris has of the Medicare system. He explained the different options available to me thoroughly and overall, the process went very well. I would recommend Chris without hesitation to anyone trying to make decisions in regard to Medicare.

George & Maxine I.

My wife is getting ready to retire and She was getting so frustrated with all the agents just wanting to sell their companies’ plans. I went to Chris when I retired so I gave him a call to set up an appointment for my wife. Chris took the time to present all retirement plans. he explained all the pros and cons of each plan and let us decide on the plan that best suited her needs. My wife, Maxine, was very happy with the choices Chris presented & explained and put her at ease about the plan choice. Chris and his team are Very Very good and we will recommend Omaha Insurance Solutions to anyone who is getting ready to retire. Chris and his team do an excellent job of getting through the Medicare Mayhem!

Judy M.

I was referred to Chris by my financial advisor. I met with 2 other agents who just wanted to sell me ‘their’ plan. Chris took the time to explain the Medicare Advantage plans and the supplements with all their ‘letters’. He gave me peace of mind, knowing that I will probably have the best health insurance coverage I’ve ever had. I thank Chris for being a big part of this first chapter in my retirement!